Trading Up: The Basics of a 1031 Tax Exchange

By Dan Huntington

Trading Up: The Basics of a 1031 Tax Exchange

A Commercial Real Estate Topic Review of the purpose, rules & options in a 1031 Tax Deferred Exchange

1031 Exchange How to by CERRON Commercial PropertiesI’ll start by saying you should consult with your tax and financial advisors for information on whether a 1031 Exchange is right for you and your financial goals. I can help you find the new property and also help you sell the old property.

A 1031 Exchange can be a great tax benefit for someone that wants to stay invested in commercial real estate and would also like to trade up and improve their commercial investment. Maybe that office warehouse with the low ceilings and dated office finish has become increasingly expensive to keep up and to lease out. Maybe a newer, high clearance warehouse with a beautiful office space and state of the art cabling and communication capabilities is just what your renters are looking for. You’ve just hit on the perfect 1031 exchange scenario. Sell that old building and buy one that fits your goals without having to give Uncle Sam any of your hard earned commercial investment profit.

There are a few things you need to know about 1031 exchanges before you take my advice and call Cerron for your property solutions. So what is a 1031 Tax Exchange? In this article I’m talking about a 1031 (also called “like-kind exchange”) being used to swap one commercial property investment asset for another and not losing 15 to 20 percent to the government in tax liability. In other words, you can change the form of your investment (trade up) without cashing out and being liable for capital gains tax, the tax is deferred.

Sorry, you can’t use a 1031 exchange for personal use. If your spouse would like a bigger, nicer, more expensive house, that’s a personal problem and a 1031 isn’t going to work to solve it. It’s for commercial investment property. There are other rules that apply also. You need to identify your property that you’re selling for a 1031 exchange before you close on it. Then you must submit the replacement property to a qualified intermediary in writing within 45 days. The qualified intermediary will hold the money from the property you sold until you purchase the new property and will facilitate the transaction. You must also close on the new like-kind property within 6 months of the sale of the original property. The IRS gives like-kind property a surprisingly liberal meaning so it may be possible to sell a farm and buy a shopping center. To get the full benefit the new property should be of equal or greater value.

There’s a quick lesson in 1031 Exchanges. Any one of us at CERRON Properties would be glad to help you get more information and help you find the perfect property for your 1031 Exchange.

Thanks,

Dan Huntington

    
Subscribe to our Monthly Newsletter